Dog Breeds

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Breed:

  • affenpinscher

    Affenpinscher

    Description
    The Affenpinscher is a small dog with a harsh, shaggy coat, and longer hair all over the face. It is a smaller version of a working terrier and therefore is not a delicate dog. It has a square-body, with a deep chest and round head with a pronounced stop. The lower jaw is undershot, protruding below the dog’s short nose. The black eyes are prominent and rounded. The neck is short and arched and the limbs are straight and well boned. The tail is carried high and docked to two-thirds its length. The hairy ears are customarily docked, pointed and erect, however some countries have banned docking of animal’s tails and ears. The coat is usually black or dark gray, but tan and red are also acceptable. The undercoat is slightly curly.

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    Temperament
    The Affenpinscher has a terrier-like personality. Unlike most terriers, they tend to get along with other dogs and pets especially when they are raised with them. They are busy, bold, inquisitive and stubborn, but they also love to monkey around, being playful and mischievous. A lively sharp-witted, little dog that is courageous and confident. A fearless defender, the Affenpinscher is an authoritarian. It is very affectionate and amusing. This friendly little dog enjoys being with its family. It needs consistent, firm training. Make sure there is some variety in the training so the dog does not become bored. They learn commands very quickly. Some may be difficult to housebreak. They are not recommended for very young children. Owners need to consistently be the dog’s pack leader to avoid the tenancy to guard their food and toys. They like to hike and go camping as long as the temperature stays above 20 degrees F. The Affenpinscher is generally quiet but can become vehemently excited when threatened or attacked and is fearless toward any aggressor. It may unwisely challenge large dogs and other large animals. They tend to bark and even climb. This little dog does best with a family who likes entertainment and has a very good sense of humor.

    Height, Weight
    Height: 10-15 inches (25-38 cm.)
    Weight: 7-8 pounds (3-3.36 kg.)

    Health Problems
    There are no major concerns, although some are prone to fractures and slipped stifle. Occasionally seen are PDA (patent ductus arteriosus), and open fontanel. Like any short-nosed breed, the Affenpinscher may suffer from respiratory problems in hot weather.

    Living Conditions
    The Affenpinscher is good for apartment life. They are very active indoors and will do okay without a yard. These dogs are sensitive to temperature extremes. Overly warm living conditions are damaging to the coat.

    Exercise
    Although it is an energetic and active little dog, a lot of its exercise needs can be met with indoor play, HOWEVER, like all dogs, the Affenpinscher should be taken for daily walks to fulfill it’s canine instinct to walk. It will also enjoy a chance to run around outside in a wide open-space.

    Life Expectancy
    About 10-12 years.

    Litter Size
    1 – 3 puppies – Average 2

    Grooming
    The Affenpinscher’s harsh coat should never be clipped short because this ruins the coat for many years. It should be brushed and combed weekly and it may be necessary to pluck it. A dog-trimming specialist usually does this but it is possible to learn how to do it yourself. Show dogs require stripping. Hair sometimes grows in the corners of the eyes, causing irritation; they should be dealt with promptly. This breed sheds little to no hair.

    Origin
    No exact data about the Affenpinscher’s origin exists. It is certainly related to the Brussels Griffon and probably to the terrier. It’s named “Monkey Dog” because of his monkey-like facial structure and expression and his curious personality. This feisty toy dog is believed to have originated in Germany. At first a farm dog and ratter, probably larger in size, the Affenpinscher was miniaturized and became a house pet during the 18th and 19th centuries. It is a ruthless hunter of mice and an outstanding watchdog. Today the Affenpinscher is primarily a companion dog. The Affenpinscher was admitted to the American Kennel Club’s studbook in 1936.

    Group
     Terrier, AKC Toy

  • Afghan Hound

    Afghan Hound

    Description
    The Afghan Hound is a sighthound with an aristocratic bearing. Tall and slender with a long, narrow, refined head, silky topknot and powerful jaws. The occiput is quite prominent. The muzzle is slightly convex (“Roman nose”) with a black nose. There is little or no stop. The teeth should meet in a level or scissors bite. The dark eyes are almond shaped. The ears lie flat to the head. The neck is long and strong. The height at the withers should be almost level and the abdomen well tucked up. The hipbones are quite prominent. The front legs are strong and straight and the feet are large and covered with long hair. The tail has a curl or ring at the tip, but is not carried over the back. The long, rich, silky coat is most often the color of sand with a darker face and ear fringes, though all colors are permitted. White markings, however, are discouraged.

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    Temperament
    Dignified, somewhat aloof, but very sweet, loyal, affectionate and sensitive, with a low dominance level. They must be trained kindly. The Afghan has been described as “a king of dogs.”   Majestic, elegant, noble and courageous, suspicious of, but not hostile to, strangers. Although tough, they will pine if they are deprived of attention. They will do best with older, considerate children. At one time, the breed had a reputation for being untrustworthy, but has now been replaced by a character that, while still spirited, is said to be more amenable to training and discipline, as they can be disobedient if it is poorly trained. This breed can be difficult to housebreak. Some are timid and high strung if they do not receive enough exercise.

    Height, Weight
    Height: Dogs 27 to 29 inches (68.58-73.66cm) slightly less for bitches.
    Weight: 58-64lb (26-34kg.)

    Health Problems
    TGenerally healthy, the Afghan has a low pain tolerance, thereby suffering even with minor injuries.

    Living Conditions
    The Afghan Hound is not recommended for apartment life. They are relatively inactive indoors and do best with acreage. This breed can live in or outdoors, although it would be happier sleeping indoors.

    Exercise
    Afghan Hounds love open spaces and must be allowed to run free in a safe area as well as having long daily walks. It needs a minimum of 30 minutes of free galloping per day.

    Life Expectancy
    About 14 years

    Litter Size
    1 – 15 puppies  –  Average 8

    Grooming
    The long, thick coat demands a great deal of attention.  When showing there is a must to bath once a week. Do not brush in-between baths in order to keep coat long and shiny. Brushing a dry coat will damage the coat and even make it more easily  matted.  Weekly baths are not as important if your Afghan is a pet and will not be shown, but doing so will make the coat less matted and will save you time in the end.  Many wear snoods indoors to protect their ears from food bowls. A special air-cushioned brush or pinbrush is useful for grooming. This breed is an average shedder.

    Origin
    This is a very ancient dog, native to Sinai, and mentioned several times in Egyptian papyruses as well as pictured in the caves of northern Afghanistan more than 4000 years ago. The breed was kept pure for centuries, and its exportation was always prohibited. It therefore only reached Europe as contraband early in this century.  This elegant sighthound was used as a shepherd and hunter of many types of game including deer, wild goats, and even wolves and snow leopards. They were also used by shepherds as herders and watchdogs. An extremely fast and agile runner, the Afghan Hound pursues game by sight. His thick coat protects against temperature extremes. In Europe and America he has become a luxurious pet because of his aristocratic beauty. Some of the Afghan’s talents are hunting, sighting, tracking, herding, watchdogging, racing, and lure coursing.

    Group
    Southern, AKC Hound

  • airedale-terrier_04_lg

    Airedale Terrier

    Description
    The Airedale Terrier is not an old breed, it is thought to have originated about a hundred years ago in the country of York in the UK from a breed known as The Ancient Working Terrier.
    The breed is also known as the “The King of Terriers,” the Airedale was named after the Valley of the Aire in England, where lots of small game flourished back then. It was originally known as the Waterside Terrier and used as a vermin hunter. However the breed was later crossed with the Otterhound to make a better swimmer and this produced the dog we know today.
    The Airedale Terrier is a large terrier with a harsh wiry coat, long flat head, and a deep chest. Its hair is bristly and resistant to dampness, but it needs stripping. The well-balanced dog stands square, with a level topline and very straight front legs. The v-shaped ears fold slightly to the side and forward. The nose is black. The teeth should meet in a level or scissors bite. The tail is carried high and is customarily docked; left undocked it should be carried gaily, but should not curl over the back. The wiry outer coat is lined with a soft undercoat. The coat should be tan with black (or dark grizzle) markings. A bit of red in the black and/or a small white star on the chest are permitted. The legs (all the way to the thigh), chest, undersides, head and ears should be tan. Sometimes tan also extends up to the shoulders.

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    Temperament
    The Airedale Terrier will usually do okay with children if they have early exposure and socialization, however they may play too rough for small ones. This breed needs to feel loved and respected. Courageous and protective. Fairly friendly with strangers. Intelligent, pleasant and loyal. Sensitive and responsive, he can be obedience trained at a high level. Airedale Terriers are fun-loving and playful  when they are puppies. Airedales will be happy to please you, if there is nothing more pressing in the environment (chipmunk, other dog, food). This breed is an independent minded dog breed. Any dog owner of this breed will give this feedback that this breed’s iq level is very sharp.  Many trainers (including Jean Donaldson, who wrote Culture Clash about the dog-human relationship) feel that humans who believe that dogs will have an inherent need to please are very likely to abuse the dogs because they see a dog who is more motivated by other things than pleasing the human as “bad,” “stubborn,” and “disloyal.” An Airedale is extremely loyal, but you would have to be an ace trainer to get him to come away from a chipmunk even for raw steak! They are naturally lively and can be very rowdy until properly trained. The Airedale Terrier needs proper obedience training and an owner who knows how to be “Top Dog”. The Airedale Terrier may have dominance challenges toward family members he sees as submissive. This can lead to willfulness and disobedience. They are not difficult to train, but they do not respond to harsh overbearing training methods. The Airedale Terrier is intelligent enough to perceive quickly what is required of it, but if you ask it to do the same thing over and over again it may refuse. Try to give it some variety to its training, making the exercise a challenge. With the right handler, the Airedale Terrier can do well in various dog sports including defense dog trials. This breed generally gets along well with household cats and other animals, but they sometimes try to dominate other dogs. This depends upon their training and the individual dog.

    Height,Weight
    Height: Dogs 22-24 inches (56-61 cm.)    Bitches 22-23 inches (56-58 cm.)
    Weight: Dogs 50-65 pounds (23-29 kg.)  Bitches 40-45 pounds (18-20 kg.)

    Health problems
    A very hardy breed, although some may suffer from eye problems, hip dysphasia and skin infections. If your Airedale Terrier has dry skin, he should be fed an adjusted omega-6/omega-3 fatty acid ratio in the diet.

    Living Conditions
    The Airedale Terrier is not recommended for apartment life. They are very active indoors and will do best with at least an average-sized yard.

    Exercise
    Airedales were bred for active work, and therefore need plenty of exercise. They need to be taken for long daily walks. Most of them love to play with a ball, swim, or retrieve objects and once fully grown will happily run alongside a bicycle. The breed makes a good house dog as long as it gets daily mental and physical exercise, this is an important point.. Without enough attention and exercise the Airedale Terrier will become restless and bored and will usually get itself into trouble. The exercise requirement can go down somewhat after the first two years (as with many dogs) but the first two years with an Airedale are very strenuous on the human. Then they start to get much more mellow.

    Life
    About 10-12 years.

    Litter Size
    Average of 9 puppies

    Grooming
    Airedales have a hard, short-haired, double coat. The hair should be plucked about twice a year, but for dogs that are to be shown, much more intensive grooming is needed. Trim excessive hair between the pads of the feet when necessary. If you keep the coat stripped it will shed little to no hair, however if you do not strip the coat, you will most likely find fur piles around your baseboards, even with trimming, and brushing almost every day. They actually require a good bit of grooming. Burrs stick in the coat and beard. The beard should be washed daily because of food residue.

    Origin
    The Airedale Terrier was developed about a hundred years ago in the country of York from the ancient Working Terrier. “The King of Terriers,” the Airedale was named for the Valley of the Aire in England, where lots of small game flourished. Originally known as the Waterside Terrier and used as a vermin hunter. The breed was later crossed with the Otter hound to make him a better swimmer. It is also said to have Manchester Terrier in its blood. In addition to his role as a small game hunter, the Airedale has been used to hunt big game in Africa, Indian and Canada, and as a police dog and army sentry dog in World War II. Today the Airedale is primarily a companion dog, but there are still working lines out there. Some of the Airedale’s talents are guarding, watch dogging, hunting, tracking, military work, police work, and competitive obedience.

    Group
    Terrier, AKC Terrier

  • akita

    Akita

    Description
    The largest of the Japanese Spitz-type breeds, the Akita, pronounced a-KEE-ta, is a powerful, solid, well-proportioned and distinctive looking dog. Strong and muscular with a flat, heavy head and strong, short muzzle. The Akita is slightly longer than he is tall with a broad, deep chest and level back. The head is broad and shaped like a blunt triangle. The stop is well-defined and there is a shallow groove going up the center of the forehead. The small, erect ears are carried forward and in line with the neck. The small, triangular eyes are dark brown. The nose is generally black (brown is permitted on white Akita’s, but black is preferred); the lips are black and the tongue is pink. The teeth should meet in a scissors, or level bite (scissors is preferred by most breeders). The tail is carried high and curled over the back. The Akita has webbed, cat-like feet – which makes it a fine swimmer. The double coat is composed of a harsh, waterproof outer coat insulated with a thick, soft undercoat. Coat colors are pure white, red, sesame and brindle. The colors should be without clear borders. A black mask is forbidden.

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    Temperament
    The Akita is docile, but sometimes spontaneous. Careful and very affectionate with its family. Intelligent, courageous and fearless. It is very willful and needs firm training as a puppy. The Akita is a first class guard dog. Japanese mothers would often leave their children in the family Akita’s care. They are extremely faithful and thrive on companionship. The Akita is very aggressive to other dogs and animals and should therefore never be allowed to run off its lead around other animals. It should definitely be supervised with other household pets and children. Although the breed may tolerate and be good with children from his own family, he may not accept other children. If teased, Akita’s may bite. Children must be taught to treat these dogs with kindness. This breed can be very food-possessive and willful. They are capable of ferocity, but with firm training, can make a fine pet. Obedience training requires patience, as these dogs tend to get bored quickly. The Akita needs to be with its family. It vocalizes with many interesting sounds, but it is not an excessive barker.

    Height, Weight
    Height: Dogs 26-28 inches (66-71 cm.) Bitches 24-26 inches (61-66 cm.)
    Weight: Dogs 75-120 pounds (34-54 kg.) Bitches 75-110 pounds (34-50 kg.)

    Health Problems
    Prone to hip dysplasia, thyroid both hypothyroid and autoimmune thyroiditis, immune diseases like VKH and Pemphigus, skin problems like SA and eyes (PRA, Micro, entropion) patella and other problems with the knee.

    Living Conditions
    The Akita will do okay in an apartment if it is sufficiently exercised. It is moderately active indoors and will do best with a large yard.

    Exercise
    The Akita needs moderate but regular exercise to stay in shape. It should be taken for long daily walks.

    Life Expectancy
    About 10-12 years

    Litter Size
    3 – 12 puppies – Average 7 or 8

    Grooming
    The coarse, stiff, short-haired coat needs significant grooming. Brush with a firm bristle brush, and bathe only when absolutely necessary as bathing removes the natural waterproofing of the coat. This breed sheds heavily twice a year.

    Origin
    The Akita is native to the island of Honshu in the region of Akita in Japan, where it has remained unchanged for centuries. Today, the Akita is considered the national dog of Japan and is designated as a Natural Monument. The breed has had many uses, first as an Imperial guard dog, then as a fighting dog, hunter of deer and bear, for sledding, and for police, army and guard work. The Akita has keen hunting abilities and can even hunt in deep snow. He has a soft mouth, so he is suitable for waterfowl retrieval. In Japan, small statues of the Akita are often sent to ill people to express a wish for their speedy recovery, and to parents of newborn children to symbolize health. The first Akita was brought to the USA by Helen Keller. American servicemen also brought Akitas to the US after World War II.

    Group
    Group Northern, AKC Working Group

  • alaskan-malamute-puppies-for-wallpaper-australia-198

    Alaskan Malamute

    Description The Alaskan Malamute is a large, strong Arctic dog with a thick, coarse double coat and a plumed tail held over the back. It is a ponderous dog, well built, with a solid body, wide head, and a proud expression. An Alaskan Malamute is commonly known as an Arctic sled dog and is the oldest sled dog breed in the world. The dog is very powerful and has a strong build, which are qualities that make it ideal for pulling a sled through the snow. A Malamute has a strong, deep chest and a body that is very muscular, more so than other breeds of comparable size. When living in a colder climate, a person could need assistance pulling loads and an Alaskan Malamute is a very helpful companion. The dog is very affectionate and loyal which are qualities that make for an ideal family pet.The feet are furry and have tough pads. It has erect ears and small, dark, almond shaped eyes. The eyes are obliquely placed in the skull. Eyes are brown, almond shaped and of medium size and look like those of a wolf, but with a sweet expression. Dark eyes are preferred. Blue Eyes are a Disqualifying Fault. The coat averages one to three inches in length and comes in white, black & white, wolf gray, wolf sable (red undercoat with dark gray outer coat), or red, often with darker highlights and sometimes with a dark mask or cap. Alaskan Malamutes are also used for sporting and recreational purposes such as mushing, bikejoring, skijoring and canicross. The Alaskan Malamute is one of the most natural and “unaltered” of all dog breeds which means it retains much of its original form and function. Malamutes as a whole are generally considered quiet dogs, seldom do they bark like other breeds. The dogs do not necessarily bark so much as they howl like a wolf or coyote. The legs and muzzle are almost always white. In some areas, dogs may be either smaller or larger than the official standard.

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    Temperament
    The Alaskan Malamute is like a rambunctious puppy. Extremely loyal and intelligent, sweet and most affectionate toward it’s master. Great with children who are old enough to play with him safely. Generally they mature into a dignified and mellow adult dog. They are very friendly and therefore are not suitable as a guard dogs. Malamutes are happiest living outdoors as long as they receive enough companionship, but they also enjoy living indoors where their human “pack” lives. Without attention, these dogs may become destructive nuisances. In one case, a single dog ruined an entire living room of furniture valued at $15,000 in just three hours! Malamutes love outdoor activities and even do well in obedience with firm encouragement. Although it can be difficult to train Malamutes for formal obedience, it is not particularly hard to train them to be well-mannered because they love to please. Males can be very dominant. Some dogs may be difficult to housebreak. This breed is a thrifty feeder and needs less food than you might expect. However they do tend to wolf down whatever is offered, which can lead to obesity and bloat. Malamutes are quiet compared to most dogs but they do like to howl and dig. This breed should be supervised around unfamiliar small animals, as they have a strong pry instinct. This does not mean they are not good with small animals. Some Malamutes have been known to raise small kittens as their own. Both sexes can be combative with other dogs, especially with the same sex and breed. Firm handling and training are necessary. Proper socialization with people and other dogs is imperative. Obedience training is highly recommended.

    Height, Weight Height-Dogs 24-26 inches (61-66 cm.) Bitches 22-24 inches (56-61 cm.) Weight-Dogs 80-95 pounds (36-43 kg.) Bitches 70-85 pounds (32-38 kg.) Health  Problems The Alaskan Malamute is generally a very hardy breed. Be careful that you are not buying your Alaskan Malamute from a puppy mill, as some dogs have been having health and temperament problems. They are prone to hip dysplasia, but no more than any other large breed and less then many others. Some are prone to chondrodysplasia, which is dwarfism. Some clubs require OFA, CERF, and CHD (dwarfism test) certification of both parents. Prone to bloat.  Living Conditions Alaskan Malamutes are not recommended for apartment life. They are fairly active indoors and should have at least a large yard. If you live in a suburban area, a high fence is a must, but bury the base, because they are likely to dig their way out. Alaskan Malamutes like to roam in what he considers to be his territory. The Malamutes coat allows them to withstand extreme cold, but be careful to keep the dog cool in hot climates. Make sure they have shade and plenty of clean cool water. Exercise Malamutes need a reasonable amount of exercise with include long daily walks. But be careful not to overdue it in warm weather.

    Life  Expectancy About 12-15 years. Litter  Size Average of 6 puppies Grooming The Alaskan Malamute has a dense coat and should be brushed twice a week. This breed is a massively heavy shedder. The undercoat comes out in clumps twice a year. Bathing is most unnecessary, as the coat sheds dirt readily. Dry shampoo occasionally. This dog is clean and odorless. Origin The Alaskan Malamute is a Nordic dog, descended from the Arctic wolf. Its name comes from Mahlemuts, an Alaskan tribe that raised and cared for these beautiful snow dogs. Originally used 2000 to 3000 years ago by these Mahlemuit Eskimos of Alaska, the dogs were their only form of transportation and were highly valued. They pulled light traveling sleds, and hauled heavy loads (including food and supplies). Later, the Malamute went with Admiral Byrd’s expeditions to the pole. This breed has amazing strength, endurance and heart. The Malamute is a sled dog. Packs of Malamutes have participated in many polar expeditions, for which they are particularly well adapted due to their tenacity, sense of direction, and excellent sense of smell. They have appeared as unforgettable characters in the stories of Jack London and Rudyard Kipling. In the last decades, they have proved themselves to be civilized and good-natured in this role. Some of the Alaskan Malamute’s talents are sledding, carting, search & rescue, weight pulling and racing. Group Northern, AKC Working

  • american_eskimo

    American Eskimo

    Description
    The American Eskimo Dog is descended from a breed of European Spitzes. These dogs were great performers and often travelled in circus troupes across the United States entertaining audiences with tricks. It was because they were naturally intelligent and easily trained that they were used in ciruses.The American Eskimo is a beautiful, snowy white Spitz-type dog. It looks like a miniature Samoyed. There are three varieties: the toy, miniature, and standard. That means there is an Eskie for all interests and house sizes. The American Eskimo has a wedge-shaped head with muzzle and skull about the same length. It has erect triangular-shaped ears, and a heavily plumed tail curled over the back. Its neck is well carried and the topline good and level. Good legs and feet allow the Eskie to trot with bold energetic action. The profuse coat is always white, or white with biscuit or cream markings. Their skin is pink or gray. Black is the preferred color of their eyelids, gums, nose, and pads. The coat is heavy around the neck, creating a ruff or mane, especially in males. The breed is slightly longer than it is tall. The coat of the American Eskimo should not curl or wave, the undercoat should be thick and plush with the harsher outer coat growing up through it. No colors other than those described above are allowed. The eyes must not be blue and no Eskie may be shown if it is under 9 inches (23cm) or over 19 inches (48cm). The breed has many admirers and it has withstood the test of time.

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    Temperament
    The American Eskimo is a charming, affectionate and loving dog. Hardy and playful, they are excellent with children. Highly intelligent and willing to please.  The American Eskimo Dog is a highly independent dog and enjoys solitude. It is persistent in remaining loyal to its master. This dog has been known to have difficulties socializing with other dogs in the household. It can have trust issues with other dogs, small pets, and young children. If you have have young children around it will be best to expose them to the dog earlier to help the dog socialize to the children. Alert and easy to train, the American Eskimo often ranks among the top scorers in obedience trials. Some individuals have a willful streak, but most like to work. Dogs whose ancestry displays nervousness, hyperactivity or viciousness should not be bred. They are naturally wary of strangers, but once introduced, they become instant friends. Some have been known to not let a stranger enter the home until the owner says it is okay. Eskimos need to be part of the family and engage in nuisance activities when isolated. Handle them gently, but firmly. This breed needs attention and loves to bark. Eskies should be thoroughly socialized when young to avoid potential aggression-related accidents.

    Height, Weight
    Toy: 9-12 inches (23-30cm)  6-10 pounds (2.4-4.5kg)
    Miniature: over 12 (30cm) up to 15 inches (38cm)   10-20 pounds (4.5-9kg)
    Standard: over 15 inches (38cm) up to 19 inches (48cm) 18-35 pounds (8kg-16kg)

    Health Problems
    The American Eskimo is a fairly healthy breed, although close attention should be paid to its eyes and tear ducts. Prone to hip dysplasia and progressive retinal atrophy. Its thick double coat should be kept clean and free of fleas that can cause dermatitis. This breed can gain weight easily if it does not get enough exercise.

    Living Conditions
    American Eskimos will do okay in an apartment if it is sufficiently exercised. It is very active indoors and a small yard will be sufficient.

    Exercise
    The American Eskimo needs to be taken on a long daily walk. They love to walk and should be well exercised either on a leash or in a safely enclosed yard.

    Life Expectancy
    About 15 or more years

    Litter Size
    Average of 5 Puppies

    Grooming
    The thick snowy white coat is easy to groom. Brush with a firm bristle brush twice a week. It should be brushed daily when it is shedding. This breed is an average shedder.

    Origin
    The American Eskimo is one of the Spitz families of Nordic breeds. They are closely related to the white German Spitz. German Spitz were eventually brought to America, where the name changed to American Eskimo Dog, due to the widespread anti-German feelings during World War I.  Today they are known as a separate breed, but are closely related to the German Spitz. Samoyed and White Keeshond are also possibly related to the America Eskimo Dog. Evidence suggests that “White Spitz” dogs were first brought to the United States by German settlers. A couple named Hall, in 1913, were the first to register the breed with the UKC. Their kennel name was “American Eskimo” which became the name of the breed. The American Eskimo was spread throughout the United States by the Barnum and Bailey Circus. Stout’s Pal Pierre was the first dog ever to walk a tight rope. The North American Eskimo Dog Association was formed in 1969, and the studbook was closed. The American Eskimo Dog Club of America formed in 1985 for the purpose of achieving AKC recognition. This goal has now been achieved. As of July 1, 1995, the American Eskimo was formally recognized by the AKC. Some of the American Eskimo’s talents are watchdog, guarding, narcotics detection, agility, competitive obedience, and performing tricks.

    Group
    Northern, AKC Non-Sporting

  • American_Foxhound

    American Foxhound

    Description
    While similar to its English cousin, the American Foxhound has been developed by its breeders to be lighter and taller, to have a keener sense of smell, and to be even faster in the chase. A large, handsome hound, its front legs are long and very straight-boned. American Foxhound is best for people with experience, as it can prove to be perplexing to educate. The breed is comparatively less sensorial compared to many other breeds. The American Foxhound is one of the breeds with the highest energy levels. The breed requires a lot of training. The head is long with a slightly domed, large skull. The ears are broad and pendant, framing the face. The eyes are large and wide-set – either brown or hazel, with a sweet, imploring expression. The ears are wide, flat to the head and its tail is carried cheerfully with a slight upward curve, like a sickle. The short, hard coat may be any color.

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    Temperament
    The American Foxhound is sweet, affectionate, gentle and loving at home, but also a brave and intense warrior in the hunt. They are excellent with children and get along well with other dogs because of their pack-hunting background, but should not be trusted with non-canine pets. Friendliness to strangers varies widely. Some are very friendly; some are protective. This breed can be difficult to housebreak. Be aware, the American Foxhound will take off after an interesting scent if possible. They like to bay and have a melodious bark, so much so, in fact, that its tones have been used in popular songs. Foxhounds don’t always make good house pets, due to their history as outdoor pack kennel hounds. If you are looking for a pet, try show lines rather than field types.

    Height, Weight
    Height: 21-25 inches (53-64cm)
    Weight: 65-75 pounds (29-34kg)

    Health Problems
    A fairly healthy breed, American Foxhounds are free of many genetic diseases such as hip and bone problems, which plague other large breeds. Do not overfeed this breed as he has a tendency to put on weight.

    Living Conditions
    American Eskimos will do okay in an apartment if it is sufficiently exercised. It is very active indoors and a small yard will be sufficient.

    Exercise
    The American Foxhound needs a great deal of exercise or he can become restless and destructive. They need to be taken on a long daily walk at least once a day, however two or three times is ideal. He can run around a square-mile (200 sq. km.) farm from early morning to late at night and return home still enthusiastic and eager to run.

    Life Expectancy
    About 10-12 years

    Litter Size
    Average of 5 – 7 puppies

    Grooming
    The smooth, short-haired coat is easy to groom. Comb and brush with a firm bristle brush, and shampoo only when necessary. This breed is an average shedder. American Foxhound cause less troubles with shedding compared to other breeds. The dogs demands pretty little grooming.
    Origin
    This marvelous Foxhound is directly descended from English hounds brought to America in 1650 and bred over a century later to a French hound sent as a gift by Lafayette to George Washington. The two breeds, French and English, in combination have produced the American Foxhound.  The breed American Foxhound are scent hounds and is a first-rate hunting dog. Scent hounds have some of the most sensitive noses among canines.In the seventeenth century, these dogs were used for seeking out Indians. Later, however they became efficient and untiring hunters of wild animals. The American Foxhound has an excellent nose, and is very fast when giving chase. He has great stamina for running and a musical bay. The American Foxhound is still primarily a hunting and field trial dog (in packs and alone), though he has had some success as a companion dog. Its talents are hunting, tracking, watchdogging and agility.

    Group

    Hound, AKC Hound

  • American-Staffordshire-Terrier-1

    American Staffordshire

    Description
    The American Staffordshire is a very muscular, stocky, yet agile dog, and is extremely strong for his size. He has a broad, powerful head, short muzzle, and very strong jaws. The ears are generally cropped, though this is optional. The eyes are round and black. The teeth should form a scissors bite. Its coat is made up of thick, short, shiny hair. All colors are admissible, but dogs must not be more than 80% white. The tail tapers to a point. The ears are erect and docked slightly. Classed by AKC as “American Staffordshire Terrier” and by UKC as “American Pit Bull Terrier.” The American Staffordshire Terrier, are generally of larger bone structure, head size and weight then their cousins the American Pit Bull Terrier.

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    Temperament
    The American Staffordshire Terrier is a happy, outgoing, stable, and confident dog. Gentle and loving towards people. Good-natured, amusing, extremely loyal and affectionate family pet. It is good with children and adults. Almost always obedient, this dog wants nothing more then to please its master. It is an extremely courageous and intelligent guard dog that is very full of life. Over the past 50 years, careful breeding has produced this friendly, trustworthy, dog who is an especially good dog for children. Courageous and a persistent fighter if provoked. Highly protective of his owners and the owner’s property, it will fight an enemy to the death if the enemy traps the dog in a corner and threatens its loved ones. This breed has a very high tolerance for pain. Some un-socialized Staffs may be dog aggressive. Socialize very thoroughly when young to curve any dog aggressive tendencies. This breed can be difficult to housebreak.  It has given outstanding results as a guardian of property, but is at the same time esteemed as a companion dog. When properly trained and socialized, the Staff makes a great family companion. This breed is not for the passive owner who does not understand that all dogs have an instinct to have a pack order.

    Height, Weight
    Height: Dogs 17-19 inches (43-48cm) Bitches 16-18 inches (41-46cm)
    Weight: 57-67 pounds (25-30 kg)

    Health Problems
    A generally healthy breed. Some are prone to hip dysplasia, hereditary cataracts and congenital heart disease.

    Living Conditions
    Staffordshire Terriers will do okay in an apartment if it is sufficiently exercised. It is very active indoors and will do alright without a yard. This breed prefers warm climates.

    Exercise
    American Staffordshire Terriers must have plenty of regular exercise and need to be taken on long daily walks.

    Life Expectancy
    About 9-15 years

    Litter Size
    Average of 5 – 10 Puppies

    Grooming
    The smooth, short-haired coat is easy to groom. Brush on a regular basis with a firm bristle brush, and bathe or dry shampoo as necessary. A rub with a piece of toweling or chamois will make the coat gleam. This breed is an average shedder.

    Origin
    In the nineteenth century in the English region of Staffordshire, crossing among the Bulldog and various terriers developed the muscular, active, combative Staffordshire Bullterrier. Brought to the United States, the breed was preferred by American breeders who increased its weight and gave it a more powerful head. Now recognized as a separate breed, the American Staffordshire is larger and heavier than his British cousin, the Staffordshire Bull Terrier. After dog fighting was banned in the United States in 1900, two strains of these dogs were developed, a show strain and a fighting dog strain. The show strain was labeled the American Staffordshire, while the fighting dog strain was labeled the American Pit Bull Terrier. The two are now being recognized as separate breeds. Today the American Pit Bull Terrier is being bred with the same gentle qualities as the American Staffordshire Terrier.  They both make great pets with the right kind of owner. Some of the American Staffordshire Terriers talents are watchdog, guarding, police work, weight pulling and agility.

    Group
    Mastiff, AKC Terrier

     

  • American Water Spaniel

    American Water Spaniel

    Description
    The American Water Spaniel is an active, muscular and hardy dog. It has a crisp-textured, tightly curled or wavy outer coat lined with a protective undercoat. Coat colors include liver or chocolate – sometimes with a small white spot on the chest. The skull is broad with a moderate stop. The American Water Spaniel is a very energetic and intelligent dog that has been used for hunting and retrieving throughout the Midwestern areas of the United States. It is an excellent swimmer that loves being in the water, even in rough water conditions or in colder temperatures. The males and females should look slightly different with females lighter, finer boned and more feminine than their masculine counterparts. Both males and females should be very balanced and proportionate in appearance, and for breeders this is considered more important than the actual sizes of the dogs.  The medium length muzzle is square and smooth. The ears are long and covered with curls and the medium length head is moderately long. The nose is either dark brown or black. The eye color should correspond with the coat color in shades of brown or hazel. The teeth meet in either a level or scissors bite. The feathered tail tapers, hanging with a slight upward curve. The tail is used as a rudder in swimming.

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    Temperament
    The American Water Spaniel is intelligent and very trainable. It is eager to learn and very enthusiastic about it’s work. It is used above all for hunting quail, duck, pheasant, grouse, and rabbit. It also makes a good guard dog and companion. Friendly, energetic, confident persistent and obedient. . The American Water Spaniel is a pleasant , willing dog that is highly sensitive, so obedience training should be calm, quiet, and persuasive, rather then demanding or sharp. These breed is good with other breeds until they knows the pup personally. It is very important for them to socialize at their early age as this breed can gain aggressiveness very easily He is easy going, loving companion that is usually excellent with children, but he could snap defensively if startled or harshly disciplined. Heavy-handed training methods are not necessary with this willing spaniel. Socialize this breed well at an early age to avoid timidity and potential dog aggressiveness as an adult. They usually get along with non-canine pets. It loves attention, but can entertain itself. Some snore and some bark and whine quite a bit. It is an enthusiastic swimmer and makes a wonderful hunter in difficult waters, in the woods and over uneven terrain. This breed likes to roam. Some may drool.

    Height, Weight
    Height:  15-18 inches (36-46 cm.)
    Weight:  25-45 pounds (11-20 kg.)

    Health Problems
    Some lines are prone to skin problems.

    Living Conditions
    American Water Spaniels will do okay in an apartment as long as they get enough exercise. They are moderately active indoors and will do best with at least an average-sized yard.

    Exercise
    The American Water Spaniel should have a lot of physical exercise, which include long daily walks.

    Life Expectancy
    About 12-15 years

    Litter Size
    Average of 4 – 6 puppies

    Grooming
    The oily coat of the American Water Spaniel needs a through brushing twice a week. Bathe only when necessary as bathing removes the natural oils in the coat and can dry out the skin. The coat may have a strong smell due to the oil. This breed is a light shedder.

    Origin
    The exact knowledge regarding the origin of this breed does not exist, but since the 18th century, the American Water Spaniel has been an all-around farm and hunting dog in the Midwestern United States, particularly in Wisconsin and Minnesota. The breed was probably developed from the Curly-Coated Retriever and Irish Water Spaniel – with possible additions of other early spaniels. The American Water Spaniel is an outstanding bird dog in swamps, woods, lakes and rivers. He has a gentle mouth and a fine nose and works well both flushing game and retrieving. He can even point out squirrels in trees by barking. The American Water Spaniel excels in swimming even in turbulent waters. Though he is the state dog of Wisconsin, the American Water Spaniel is still quite rare in the United States. Only about 270 were registered with the AKC in 1990, however since the American Water Spaniel is primarily a hunting dog rather than a show dog, owners often do not bother to officially register them, therefore there is probably many more born than registered. The American Water Spaniel makes a fine family companion.

    Group
    Gun Dog

  • anatolian-shepherd

    Anatolian Shepherd

    Description
    The Anatolian Shepherd Dog is a large, noble and powerful livestock guardian. He is very similar to the Great Pyrenees and the Kuvasz, but is more slender and agile. Capable of great speed and endurance. The head is large, but in good proportion with the rest of the body. The rectangular muzzle should be a bit shorter than the skull, with a blunt profile and is often black. The skull is wide and slightly rounded, with a slight stop. The lips are edged in black and hang down slightly, however the upper lip should not hang down lower than the bottom jaw’s lower edge. The teeth should meet in a scissors bite. The triangular, pendant ears are often black and rather small with rounded tips. In Turkey, the ears are often cropped very short. The small, deep-set eyes range from gold to brown in color. Liver colored dogs have brown eye rims and a brown nose. Nose and eye rims for all other dogs should be black. The thick, muscular neck has a slight dewlap. Those who are familiar with breeds like the Great Pyrenees will see a great deal of similarity in the Anatolian Shepherd. This breed is slightly more slender, however. It’s a fast dog that has tremendous endurance. The topline is mainly level; though slightly rounded at the loin. The chest reaches to the elbows. The back is short relative to leg length. The front legs are straight and set well apart. When the dog is alert, the high-set tail is carried curled over the back; otherwise, it hangs low with a slightly upward curl reaching the hocks. The short or rough double coat is generally fawn with a black mask, though any color is acceptable. Other frequently seen colors include pinto, white and brindle. The outer coat is smooth and the length may vary greatly depending on the season and the dog’s lineage – it is longer around the collar and tail. There are two basic coat types: medium length and medium long.

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    Temperament
    The Anatolian Shepherd is a very loyal, alert and possessive dog. It is intelligent and easy to train, but is not a dog for beginners. It needs a handler who naturally radiates leadership. Calm, steadfast and brave, but not aggressive. Independent, very watchful, proud and self-assured. Affectionate with their own family, but suspicious of strangers, especially after reaching adulthood. Strangers should be formally introduced before the mature dog is asked to accept them. The Anatolian Shepherd is possessive with respect to its home and property and will not allow anyone into the family property if the owner is not home, unless it has had frequent contact with the person, but he is fairly friendly with those people the family accepts. The dog is demanding of itself, and can be stubborn and dominant. When training the Anatolian Shepherd, the best results are achieved by motivational training methods with a determined, consistent and loving approach. It is very important to begin training as early as possible, because a fully grown dog may be too strong and too big to be corrected and because this dog has his own ideas and will not cater to his owner’s every whim. Sensitive to reprimands and eager to receive affection. This breed is patient and protective with children of the family, but may accidentally knock them down. Children should always be supervised and properly introduced. The Anatolian Shepherd does not require any additional protection training. It already has very strong protection instincts that grow as the dog matures, often coming suddenly to the fore at around one and a half years of age. They will generally get along with other animals provided they have been introduced to them when they are still young. They can be rather dominant towards other dogs and it is important to socialize them while they are still young. These dogs mature quite slowly, reaching full adulthood at about four years old. Dogs that are going to be made into flock guards should not be family pets or they will prefer the family over the sheep. They should live their entire life with the flock, but still should be socialized with people out in the field and accustomed to grooming procedures when they are puppies to make veterinary care possible later in life. Anatolian Shepherds guard, but do not herd, livestock. They often patrol the outer perimeter of their territory, then find a high place from which to watch over their charges. Anatolians possess excellent senses of sight and hearing to help them in this work. They check their “protective zone” around the flock every few hours to be certain nothing threatening is brewing. If danger approaches, the Anatolian will first bark a warning, then accelerate and raise the volume of the barking if the danger persists, signaling the sheep to crowd in behind him for protection. The dog will attempt to drive the danger away and will only attack as the last resort. In Turkey, the Anatolian Shepherds wear spiked collars to protect their throats in battles with predators. They will do best on a low-protein, lamb and rice diet. They do not eat much for their size. Extensive early socialization, obedience training and consistent dominant leadership are very important when owning an Anatolian Shepherd. They tend to bark at night and some like to dig.

    Height, Weight
    Height:  Dogs 28-30 inches (71-76 cm.)       Bitches 26-28 inches (66-71 cm.)
    Weight: Dogs 100-150 pounds (45-68 kg.) Bitches 90-130 pounds (41-59 kg.)

    Health Problems
    Some are prone to eyelid entropion or to hypothyroidism. Hip dysplasia does occur, but is not as common as some other large breeds. They are sensitive to anesthesia. The Anatolian Shepherd’s immunity often takes longer to develop than with many other breeds and therefore young Anatolians should be given extra vaccinations against parvo-virus.

    Living Conditions
    Anatolian Shepherds are not recommended for apartment life. They are relatively inactive indoors and will do best with at least a large yard. This breed is very suspicious of strangers, and it is therefore necessary to provide a secure, fenced yard.

    Exercise
    This breed needs a lot of exercise. They do best when they can run free in their own fenced-in yard, but still need to go on long daily walks.

    Life Expectancy
    About 12-15 years

    Litter Size
    5 – 10 puppies

    Grooming
    This breed requires little grooming. The coat needs thorough brushing-out during the twice a year shedding season. You can get away with little attention the rest of the year. The Anatolian Shepherd is a seasonal, heavy shedder.

    Origin
    The Anatolian Shepherd is native to Asia Minor. It protects flocks and serves as a shepherd’s companion. On the high Anatolian Plateau, where summers are hot and very dry and winters are cold, the Anatolian Shepherd Dogs live outside all year round. For centuries the ancestors of the Anatolian Shepherd were used as a combat dog in war and for hunting. It was particularly valued for the victorious battles it could fight with wolves. As a sheepdog, it was bothered by neither fatigue nor bad weather. Today it is still used as a sheep dog as well as a guard dog. The Anatolian Shepherd is very closely related to the Kangal Dog and some people even declare all Turkish shepherd’s i.e. the Kangal Dog, to be one breed, the Anatolian Shepherd, however the true Turkish Kangal Dogs are said to be a separate breed from the generic Turkish shepherd’s dog. The Anatolian Shepherd responds well to positive, motivational training techniques. Training requires a great deal of consistency, applied with a loving touch. Training should begin as soon as possible. A mature Anatolian Shepherd may be more difficult to train due to its size and its naturally strong independent streak. The isolated historical conditions of the Sivas-Kangal region has resulted in the development of the Kangal Dog as a distinct breed, which has been declared the National Dog of Turkey and a national treasure. The true Turkish Kangal Dogs are first and foremost still primarily working shepherds. The export of pure Kangal Dogs from Turkey has been controlled and now is virtually forbidden. The Kangal Dog Club of America continues to work to ease import restrictions. Imported dogs are considered to be extremely valuable for their potential contribution to the genetic pool in the United States.

    Group
    Flock Guard

  • australian- shepherd

    Australian Shepherd

    Description
    The Aussie, as it is known, is a medium-sized, robust, well-balanced, rustic dog. The ears are set on high at the side of the head, triangular and slightly rounded at the tip. The coat is of medium texture, straight to slightly wavy, weather resistant, of moderate length with an undercoat. The quantity of undercoat varies with climate. Hair is short and smooth on the head, outside of ears, front of forelegs and below the hocks. Backs of forelegs are moderately feathered; breeches are moderately full. There is a moderate mane and frill, more pronounced in dogs than bitches.  An identifying characteristic is his natural or docked bobtail. He should be attentive, lively and agile with a body slightly longer than its height at the withers. The Aussie has a strong, deep chest and stands squarely on all fours. The front legs are straight. Front dewclaw removal is optional, but rear dewclaws are generally removed. The feet are compact and oval with arched toes. The top of the head is approximately the same length as the slightly tapering muzzle. The head has a moderate stop. The teeth form a scissors bite. The medium-sized oval eyes come brown, blue, amber, or any variation or combination including flecks and marbling. The ears are set on high at the side of the head, triangular and slightly rounded at the tip, of moderate size with length measured by bringing the tip of the ear around to the inside corner of the eye. The medium length coat comes in blue merle, red (liver) merle, solid black, and solid red (liver) all with or without white markings and/or tan (copper) points with no order of preference. The hair around the ears and eyes should not be white. The coat may be straight or slightly wavy, and should have feathering on the back of the legs, and a mane and frill around the neck. Hair on the head, front of the forelegs and on the outside of the ears is shorter than the rest of the coat. The tail is generally docked if it is longer then 4 inches, though most are naturally short. Each individual’s masculinity or femininity is clearly defined.

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    Temperament
    Australian Shepherds are easy going, perpetual puppies that love to play. Courageous, loyal and affectionate, they are excellent children’s companions that are great with active children. A devoted friend and guardian, for they are naturally protective. Very lively, agile and attentive – they are eager to please, with a sixth sense about what the owner wants. Australian Shepherds are highly intelligent and easy to train. Though aggressive when at work with livestock, the Aussie is gentle with human friends. Australian Shepherds needs lots of exercise and a job to do, as the breed is very intelligent, active and easily bored. They can become nervous and destructive if left alone too much without exercise. They are naturally suspicious of strangers, so they should be well socialized as puppies. Working lines of Australian Shepherds may be too energetic to be suitable pets. Some like to nip people’s heals in an attempt to herd them. They are quiet workers, unlike some breeds, which are bred to bark constantly at livestock. This breed is not usually dog aggressive.

    Height, Weight
    Height: Dogs 20-23 inches (52-58cm.) Bitches 18-21 inches (46-53cm.)
    Weight: Dogs 50-65 pounds (25-29 kg) Bitches 40-55 pounds (18-25 kg.)

    Health Problems
    The gene for the beautiful merle coloration also carries a blind/deaf factor. This may be expressed only in merle/merle crosses. Be sure to check the hearing on merle puppies. Natural bobtail-to-natural bobtail breedings can result in some offspring with serious spinal defects. Major concerns: cataract, CEA. Minor concerns: CHD, nasal solar dermatitis, Pelger – Huet syndrome, iris coloboma. Occasionally seen: lumbar sacral syndrome, epilepsy, PRA, vWD, distichiasis, PDA, PPM. Suggested tests: hip, eye. Some are prone to hip dysplasia This breed is often sensitive to ivermectin; however, the dosage for heartworm preventive is considered safe. Also IMHA (Immune Mediated Hemolytic Anemia)

    Living Conditions
    This breed is not recommended for apartment life. They are moderately active indoors and will do best with at least a large yard.

    Exercise
    This energetic working dog needs plenty of vigorous exercise to stay in shape, mentally and physically, or better yet, some real work to do. Very intelligent and crave a good challenge. They need to be taken on a daily, brisk, long walk, jog or run alongside you when you bicycle. If under-exercised, this breed can become restless and destructive.

    Life Expectancy
    About 12-15 years

    Litter Size
    6 – 9 puppies –  Average 7

    Grooming
    The coat is easy to groom and needs little attention. Brush occasionally with a firm bristle brush and bathe only when necessary. This breed is an average shedder.

    Origin
    Despite the misleading name, the Australian Shepherd is not Australian at all, but was developed entirely in the U.S. to work as a herding dog on ranches. It is possible that the name was derived from one of the dog’s ancestors. The breed’s principal forebears were most likely Spanish dogs that accompanied the Basque shepherds and herds of fine Merino sheep exported to both America and Australia in the early days of the colonies. At some point it probably crossed with Collie stock. It has only recently gained recognition as a distinct breed. Its many talents include, retrieving, herding, watchdogging, guarding, police work, narcotics detection, search & rescue, agility, competitive obedience and performing tricks.

    Group
    Herding, AKC Herding

  • terror

    Australian Terrier

    Description
    one of the most sensible and least demanding of the terriers, the Australian is nonetheless as hardy and spunky as the rest. The Aussie, as it is known, is a medium-sized, robust, well-balanced, rustic dog. The ears are set on high at the side of the head, triangular and slightly rounded at the tip. The coat is of medium texture, straight to slightly wavy, weather resistant, of moderate length with an undercoat. The quantity of undercoat varies with climate. Hair is short and smooth on the head, outside of ears, front of forelegs and below the hocks. Backs of forelegs are moderately feathered; breeches are moderately full. There is a moderate mane and frill, more pronounced in dogs than bitches.  Though he can be scrappy with other dogs of the same sex, most Australian Terriers are willing to coexist peacefully with other pets. But they can be bossy and they are chasers, bred to pursue anything that runs. An identifying characteristic is his natural or docked bobtail. He should be attentive, lively and agile with a body slightly longer than its height at the withers. The Aussie has a strong, deep chest and stands squarely on all fours. The front legs are straight. Front dewclaw removal is optional, but rear dewclaws are generally removed. The feet are compact and oval with arched toes. The top of the head is approximately the same length as the slightly tapering muzzle. The head has a moderate stop. The teeth form a scissors bite. The medium-sized oval eyes come brown, blue, amber, or any variation or combination including flecks and marbling. The ears are set on high at the side of the head, triangular and slightly rounded at the tip, of moderate size with length measured by bringing the tip of the ear around to the inside corner of the eye. The medium length coat comes in blue merle, red (liver) merle, solid black, and solid red (liver) all with or without white markings and/or tan (copper) points with no order of preference. The hair around the ears and eyes should not be white. The coat may be straight or slightly wavy, and should have feathering on the back of the legs, and a mane and frill around the neck. Hair on the head, front of the forelegs and on the outside of the ears is shorter than the rest of the coat. The tail is generally docked if it is longer then 4 inches, though most are naturally short. Each individual’s masculinity or femininity is clearly defined.

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    Temperament
    Australian Shepherds are easy going, perpetual puppies that love to play. Courageous, loyal and affectionate, they are excellent children’s companions that are great with active children. A devoted friend and guardian, for they are naturally protective. Very lively, agile and attentive – they are eager to please, with a sixth sense about what the owner wants. Australian Shepherds are highly intelligent and easy to train. Though aggressive when at work with livestock, the Aussie is gentle with human friends. Australian Shepherds needs lots of exercise and a job to do, as the breed is very intelligent, active and easily bored. They can become nervous and destructive if left alone too much without exercise. They are naturally suspicious of strangers, so they should be well socialized as puppies. Working lines of Australian Shepherds may be too energetic to be suitable pets. Some like to nip people’s heals in an attempt to herd them. They are quiet workers, unlike some breeds, which are bred to bark constantly at livestock. This breed is not usually dog aggressive.

    Height, Weight
    Height: Dogs 20-23 inches (52-58cm.) Bitches 18-21 inches (46-53cm.)
    Weight: Dogs 50-65 pounds (25-29 kg) Bitches 40-55 pounds (18-25 kg.)

    Health Problems
    The gene for the beautiful merle coloration also carries a blind/deaf factor. This may be expressed only in merle/merle crosses. Be sure to check the hearing on merle puppies. Natural bobtail-to-natural bobtail breedings can result in some offspring with serious spinal defects. Major concerns: cataract, CEA. Minor concerns: CHD, nasal solar dermatitis, Pelger – Huet syndrome, iris coloboma. Occasionally seen: lumbar sacral syndrome, epilepsy, PRA, vWD, distichiasis, PDA, PPM. Suggested tests: hip, eye. Some are prone to hip dysplasia This breed is often sensitive to ivermectin; however, the dosage for heartworm preventive is considered safe. Also IMHA (Immune Mediated Hemolytic Anemia)

    Living Conditions
    This breed is not recommended for apartment life. They are moderately active indoors and will do best with at least a large yard.

    Exercise
    This energetic working dog needs plenty of vigorous exercise to stay in shape, mentally and physically, or better yet, some real work to do. Very intelligent and crave a good challenge. They need to be taken on a daily, brisk, long walk, jog or run alongside you when you bicycle. If under-exercised, this breed can become restless and destructive.

    Life Expectancy
    About 12-15 years

    Litter Size
    6 – 9 puppies –  Average 7

    Grooming
    The coat is easy to groom and needs little attention. Brush occasionally with a firm bristle brush and bathe only when necessary. This breed is an average shedder.

    Origin
    he Australian Terrier is descended from the rough coated type terriers brought from Great Britain to Australia in the early 19th century
    Despite the misleading name, the Australian Shepherd is not Australian at all, but was developed entirely in the U.S. to work as a herding dog on ranches. It is possible that the name was derived from one of the dog’s ancestors. The breed’s principal forebears were most likely Spanish dogs that accompanied the Basque shepherds and herds of fine Merino sheep exported to both America and Australia in the early days of the colonies. At some point it probably crossed with Collie stock. It has only recently gained recognition as a distinct breed. Its many talents include, retrieving, herding, watchdogging, guarding, police work, narcotics detection, search & rescue, agility, competitive obedience and performing tricks.

    Group
    Terrier, AKC Terrier

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